The Tambopata National Park

Lowland Amazonia Rainforest Specialties.
The Diverse Peruvian Amazon

Photographer: Rainforest Expeditions

A relaxing birding tour based at comfortable lodges in the extremely diverse rainforests of southeastern Amazonian Peru. We have a great number of easily accessible lowland rain forest habitats close to our lodges Posada Amazonas, Refugio Amazonas and the Tambopata Research Center

Day 1: Arrive in Lima and transfer to our hotel in Lima. Overnight at our hotel close to the airport. B:L:D
Day 2:Flight from Lima to Puerto Maldonado. Upon arrival to Puerto Maldonado we will drive to the Tambopata River Port. This forty five minute drive will take twice as long as we stop along the road's secondary forest to scan for Purus Jacamar, White browed Blackbird, Pearl Kite, and Scaled Pigeon. A private boat with individual seats and a roof will drive us upriver to Posada Amazonas. As we eat lunch on the boat, we may see: Pied Lapwing, Collared Plover, King Vulture, Bat Falcon, Olive and Russet-backed Oropendolas and Ringed Kingfisher and Amazon Kingfisher. Overnight at Posada Amazonas. B:L:D
Day 3: A thirty minute walk from the lodge takes us to this 30 meter tall scaffolding tower, which will add a whole new dimension to our Amazon birding experience: the forest canopy. We will wait for a canopy mixed flock to appear. The mixed flock is mostly all about tanagers: Paradise Tanager, Green-and-gold Tanager, Flame-crested Tanager, Turqoise Tanager, Opal- rumped Tanager and others. The tower also offers good opportunity for Cream- colored Woodpecker, Gilded Barbet, Plum-throated Cotinga and Striolated Puffbird. Macaws and toucans are seen flying against the horizon, including Chestnut-eared, Lettered,Curl-crested, and Brown-mandibled Aracaries. We will see lonely raptors riding the thermals. This is your best chance for hawk-eagles and even Harpy! After lunch we will bird the Shahue trail good for Fiery-capped Manakin, Round-tailed Manakin, Pale-winged Trumpeter and Pavonine Quetzal. Overnight at Posada Amazonas B:L:D
Day 4: Tres Chimbadas is thirty minutes by boat and forty five minutes walking from Posada Amazonas. Once there you will paddle around the lake in a catamaran, searching for the resident family of nine giant river otters (seen by 60% of our lake visitors) and other lakeside wildlife such as caiman, Hoatzin and Horned Screamers. But first, leaving lake side birding behind, we will focus on bamboo specialists. We will look for the endemic White-cheeked Tody Tyrant, Peruvian Recurvebill, Red-billed Scythebill, Rufous-headed Woodpecker, Rufous-breasted Piculet, Brown-rumped Foliage Gleaner, Large- headed Flatbill, Dusky- tailed Flatbill, Dusky-cheeked Foliage-gleaner, Flammulated Bamboo-tyrant, Dot- winged and Ornate Antwren, White-lined Antbird, Rufous capped Nunlet, Pheasant Cuckoo and Striped Cuckoo. Later we head upriver. During the first three hours of the boat ride, as we enter the Tambopata National Reserve, we will focus on recapping and listing. Then the fun begins and it lasts for three more hours! Numerous egrets, Capped Heron, Cocoi Heron, Large and Yellow-billed Tern, Black Skimmer, Horned Screamer, Razor-billed Curassow, Blue-throated Piping Guan and Orinoco Goose and during the dry season months, migrant shorebirds, are all possibilities on this of the trip. Every now and then Macaws, Toucans and raptors will be spotted. After dinner scientists will provide an in depth look at the biology of macaws, their feeding habits, the theories for clay lick use, their breeding and feeding ecology, population fluctuations and the threats to their conservation. Overnight at Tambopata Research Center. B:L:D
Day 5 and 6: One day we will cross the river and enjoy the world's largest known Macaw Clay Lick where hundreds of parrots and macaws of up to 15 species congregate daily. We can expect to see ten to twelve of the following members of the parrot family: Red-and-green, Blue and Yellow, Scarlet, Red-bellied, Chestnut-fronted and Blue-headed Macaws; Mealy and Yellow-crowned Amazons; Blue-headed, Orange-cheeked and White-bellied Parrots; Dusky-headed, White-eyed, Cobalt-winged and Tui Parakeets and Dusky-billed Parrotlets. We will explore the quintessential rainforest on the 5 mile Ocelot Trail and the 5 mile Toucan Trail systems. The Ocelot Trail is in the floodplain with ponds and streams forming during the rainy season. The Toucan Trail on the other hand is tall rainforest that rarely or never floods. Both of these trails represent the most specious habitats for birds. Too many possibilities to list, this is habitat for Starred Wood Quail, Pale-winged Trumpeter, several Trogons, Foliage-gleaners, Black-tailed Leaftosser, many Woodcreepers, Antbirds, Flycatchers, Manakins, and much more. Mixed species flocks are especially diverse with understory flocks led by Dusky-throated Antshrike and Red-crowned Ant-Tanagers. They often contain 30-40 species (or more!) including: Plain winged Antshrike, Bluish Slate Antshrike, White eyed Antwren, Plain breasted Antwren, Thrush-like Antpitta, White winged Shrike Tanager, Amazonian Barred Woodcreeper and Spix's Woodcreeper. The Ocelot trail also crosses some permanently flooded old ponds inhabited by Agami Heron, Rufescent Tiger-heron, Pygmy and Green-and-rufous Kingfishers, and Sunbittern. After long hikes we can continue to bird within the confines of TRC. Species possible on the TRC clearing include: eventual canopy flocks, Squirrel Cuckoo, Masked Crimson Tanager, Cinammon- throated Woodcreeper, Speckled Chachalaca and Yellow-tufted Woodpecker. We will bird at the transitional forests above the clay lick. These were bamboo forests until they flowered and died out a few years ago. Now they are akin to riparian forests but will eventually grow into terra firme as they are not affected by yearly floods. Here we will spot White-throated Jacamar, Buff-throated Saltator, Grayish Saltator, Scarlet-hooded Barbet, Crested and Russet-backed Oropendolas, Piratic Flycatatcher, Yellow-billed Nunbird and others. While birding these spots we will have extraordinary views of the Tambopata winding its way from the highlands.Night Tambopata Research Centre. B:L:D
Day 7: We will explore older river created habitats at a pond five minutes upstream from TRC – forests of Cecropia and Balsa Wood with a bamboo understory. This is the habitat of the rare Rufous-fronted Anthrush, and the Lemon-throated Barbet, Spot-breasted Woodpecker, Cabanis Spinetail, Amazonian Antpitta, Blackish Antbird, Fuscous Flycatcher, Guira Tanager and Orange-backed Troupial. As we exit the forest, we will bird on grassy areas with Tessaria and young Cecropia trees. These are not very diverse for birds but are the main habitat for Plain-crowned and Dark-breasted Spinetails, Mottle-backed Elaenia, Spotted Tody-Flycatcher, Black-billed Thrush, Orange-headed Tanager, and Seedeater species among others. A visit to the palm swamp may allow us to spot the Cinereous and Great Tinamou, Point-tailed Palmcreeper, Silvered and Plumbeous Antbirds, White-eyed Attila, Sulphury Flycatcher, Fork-tailed Palm Swift and Pectoral Sparrow. After dinner, we will venture out near the lodge to spot-light Pauraque, Tawny-bellied Screech-Owl, Great Potoo, Long tailed Potoo, Ocellated Poorwill and if we are lucky a Mottled Owl or Crested Owl. There is also the possibility of taking macro shots of American Bullfrogs, Horned Frog, tree frogs and other creatures of the night. Overnight at Tambopata Research Center B:L:D
Day 8: A three and a half hour boat ride brings us to Refugio Amazonas. A thirty minute walk from Refugio Amazonas leads to the 25 meter scaffolding canopy tower. A banistered staircase running through the middle provides safe access to the platforms above. The tower has been built upon high ground, therefore increasing your horizon of the continuous primary forest extending out towards the Tambopata National Reserve. From here views of mixed species canopy flocks as well as toucans, macaws and raptors are likely. Overnight at Refugio Amazonas B:L:D
Day 9: A 2 km trail will take us along the Tambopata River. Diversity is guaranteed as the trail crosses both Terra Firme Forest and Secondary Forest. We will look for Black-fronted Nunbird, Bluish-fronted Jacamar, Fiery-capped Manakin, Gray -crowned Flycatcher and Yellow-browed Tody-flycatcher, among many other species. Since Refugio Amazonas is built on land which was once part of a timber concession and cattle ranch the forest on parts of our trail system are secondary. This means we will focus on: Barred Antshrike, Short-tailed Pygmy Tyrant, Streaked Flycatcher, Boat-billed Flycatcher, Solitary Black Cacique, Gray-fronted Dove, Ruddy Ground Dove and others. Overnight at Refugio Amazonas B:L:D
Day 10: We retrace our river and road journey back to Puerto Maldonado and catch the flight to Lima and connecting international flights ( or to Cusco if desired) Depending on airline schedules, this may require dawn departures. B
Boat Transportation: All the boats are 20 foot long, roofed canoes with 55 hp outboard motors. Daily arrivals and departures from every port are scheduled to meet every airline´s arrival and departure with a maximum two hour wait. We reserve the right to change the order of activities.
Does not include air Lima - Cusco & Puerto Maldonado – Lima but we will purchase these on request – the price depends on when we get your full name, deposit and passport numbers – you can check current prices at www.LAN.com , www.taca.com and starperu.com/

Customer Testimonials

Joe Crichton Wildbird Tours - Canada

The recent trip was a success. Thanks for the organization. I have nothing to complain about, which is a good thing because it meant that everything went exactly as planned. Silverio was excellent. We very quickly learned how to work together and he was a great pleasure to work with. He took command during the day. Being a native Peruvian was a real bonus for my clients. I loved his sense of humor and I would not hesitate to have him as the bird guide on the next trip, or recommend him to people who might be planning to do Peru on their own and need your guidance.

Jill Klein - USA

My husband and I and two other couples just returned from a three week birding expedition in Peru with your organization. I wanted to let you know that we thoroughly enjoyed our trip, but it would not have been as wonderful if not for our guide. His unique take on everything, from geography, all things natural and life in general was savored by all. His able leadership and ability to navigate everything from mountain passes to Rain Forest Trails was extraordinary and I, for one, always felt safe and informed. Regarding the birding aspect of the trip, he surpassed our expectations, charmed us with his expertise in spotting and calling birds and kept us itching for more.

Submit a testimonial

Comments

The recent trip was a success. Thanks for the organization. I have nothing to complain about, which is a good thing because it meant that everything went exactly as planned. Silverio was excellent. We very quickly learned how to work together and he was a great pleasure to work with. He took command during the day. Being a native Peruvian was a real bonus for my clients. I loved his sense of humor and I would not hesitate to have him as the bird guide on the next trip, or recommend him to people who might be planning to do Peru on their own and need your guidance.

My husband and I and two other couples just returned from a three week birding expedition in Peru with your organization. I wanted to let you know that we thoroughly enjoyed our trip, but it would not have been as wonderful if not for our guide. His unique take on everything, from geography, all things natural and life in general was savored by all. His able leadership and ability to navigate everything from mountain passes to Rain Forest Trails was extraordinary and I, for one, always felt safe and informed. Regarding the birding aspect of the trip, he surpassed our expectations, charmed us with his expertise in spotting and calling birds and kept us itching for more.

Add new comment

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
2 + 2 =
Solve this simple math problem and enter the result. E.g. for 1+3, enter 4.